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20110701
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the crucial southern provinces of afghanistan for karzai. his death has been described as a huge setback for karzai and for the international coalition that is trying to support the karzai government in kabul. let's try to understand why he was such a crucial figure. it provides a window into understanding the future of afghanistan. ahmed walid karzai was ruthless with tribes that would not support his brother, cutting them off from any aid and military assistance. in addition, he gave the american and british forces in afghanistan information on hostile tribes, provided crucial intelligence on key groups and militants. he was also the first afghan leader to begin talking with the taliban about cease-fires and their entry into government. in other words, he was a practical deal maker. now, he was famous in the west or notorious for the corruption that surrounded him. but corruption surrounded all of the billions of dollars in american and western military aid and spending being brought into afghanistan. everyone in afghanistan was corrupt. ahmed karzai was an ally and an effective deal m
into understanding the future of afghanistan. amid wally carsi karzai was rut with troops not supporting his brother, cutting them off from any aid. he gave the american and brid tisch forces information on hostile tribes, provided crucial intelligence on key groups and militants. he was the first afghan leader to begin talking with the taliban about ceasefires and their entry in the government. in other words, he was a practical deal maker. now, he was famous in the west or notorious for the corruption that surrounded him. but corruption surrounded all of the billions of dollars in american and western military aid and spending being brought into afghanistan. everyone in afghanistan was corrupt. amid karzai was an ally and effective deal maker. a journalist recalls he was a wheeler dealer in the classic afghan mode. but if tefs a rogue, he was a loveable rogue who charmed you, one way of doing political business in afghanistan. karzai's death reminds us it is the kind of political business he excelled at that we need urgently. that is what will ultimately bring stability to afghanistan, whether the
a role in that contact. >> okay. i want to move on to afghanistan. you had a very interesting piece in "the new york times" in which you said that the administration should take its cues in terms of its withdraw in afghanistan from nixon and kissinger's withdrawal from vietnam. that is not usually looked upon as a model of success. so explain what you meant. >> nixon and kissinger tried to extricate the united states from the war in vietnam. they knew they weren't going to win. they were going to lose. they tried to tiptoe away and leave the local parties to keep fighting by themselves. it almost worked. but after the u.s. got out, the whole house of cards came falling down because congress wouldn't let the government support saigon because the local parties weren't able to defend themselves and so forth. i think essentially, if the obama administration can tiptoe out of the ground combat in afghanistan while continuing to support the regime in kabul and continuing to bash the enemies and so forth, essentially you could get extrication even as essentially the war continues. that str
for you. >>> canada pulled the last of the combat troops out of afghanistan this week. this brings us to our question of the week. how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assistance force? is it a, 6, b, 16, c, 26 or d 46. stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/gps for ten more questions. while you're there, make sure you check out our website, the global public square where you'll find smart interviews and essays and takes by our favorite experts. you will also find all of our gps shows. if you miss one, you can click and watch. don't forget, you can follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's book of the week is the last narco. it takes you deep inside the life of a man known as elchapo now that bin laden is dead, this mexican drug king pin is the number one most wanted man in the world. he's also on forbes list of the world top billionaires, it's a fascinating look at the man, the operation and international hunt for him. very well written. and now for the last look. we often think our politicians ar
insurance. >>> can a day pulled the last of its troops out of afghanistan this week. that brings us to our question of the week -- how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assist tansz force? is it 6, 16, 26 or 46? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. make sure you go to cnn.com/gps for ten more question and make sure you check out the global public square don't forget, you can also follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's "book of the week" is the "the last narco." it takes you deep into the life. now that bin laden is dead, this mexican drug kingpin is the number one most ban wanted man in the world, also on "forbes" list of the world's top billionaires. it's a fascinating look at the man. very well written. >>> we often think or politicians are always bickering. it might make you feel better to look at the case of australia, where it seems lawmakers have been literally been fighting like cats and dogs. listen to this. >> if i can finish now. >> why don't you meow when a woman does that. >> yes. what you hear there
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)